Quarter Horse

Quarter Horse Racing Origin Name

The origin of the quarter horse in America was in the east coast of the USA when several local breeds were crossed with English Thoroughbred. The powerful, quick and smaller breed that results from  this crossing was usually used by the colonists int he 17th century as a work and a race horse at the same time.His sprinting ability for the quarter mile races, gave to the “Famous American Quarter Horse “even more popularity, and as a result people started to call them Quarter horse or American quarter horse.Other breeds that also contributed to the modern quarter horse were:the Arabian horse,the Morgan,  and several more.

Later on, in the 1900 in their way to the west, the colonial American quarter horses were crossed with Mustangs that descended from breeds brought from the Spanish Conquistadors. Sooner than later the pioneers discovered that they were naturally skillful for the tasks that were needed to execute in the ranch especially working cattle..

Quarter Horse Racing And Rodeo

Handling livestock is a job in which a quarter horse couldn’t be replaced by even the most advanced technology, making the development of the American quarter horses even more profound.

The progress of both, the cowboys and the quarter horses were the origin of one of the most celebrated American traditions “the Rodeo” and together with racing horses contributed to the growth of the horse breeders in the country.

In order to preserve the quality of the bloodline, numerous ranchers and cowboys of the southwestern states of the USA shaped the AQHA (American Quarter Horse Association).

Notable Quarter Horse Sires

Wimpy

Son of Solis and Panda, descended from Old Sorrel, and was the first horse registered by the “AQHA”. He was honored with the P-1 registration number due to that he earned the grand Champion Stallion award in 1941 at the Southwestern Exposition Quarter Horse show in Texas.

The foal presented a sock, a star in his chestnut body color and fully developed weighed about 1200 pounds and was 15 hands high.

Joe Reed (Quarter Horse)

The stallion was fouled in 1921, and of chestnut color was given the P-3 registration number by the AQHA. The foal was a sun of a thoroughbred short track race horse, and a mare which her breed was not agreed by all the experts. The Horse died in 1947.

Oklahoma Star

Owned and breaded by Tommy Moore Oklahoma Star was a very important Quarter Horse for the evolution of the breed.

Registered by the AQHA stud book with P-6 number, the horse was often seen participating in match races in Oklahoma. He was an offspring of a thoroughbred sire named Dennis Reed and Cutthroat as his mare.

Chief

The quite a big horse for the American Quarter Horse standards, lived about 30 years and was the sun of Little Annie and Peter McCue. His registration number was P-5, and even he was never recognized for his racing performance, he is regarded for his important contribution to the American Quarter horse bloodlines.

American Quarter Breed Characteristics

The Quarter Horse usually is between 14 and 16 hands high and can be found as a racing variety or as a stock variety, both are muscular and strong. Their head is known for its traditional profile and refinement, and their chest is potent and wide.

The main difference between them is that the racing Quarter Horses are more stylized and their muscles are less notable.

Even though they come in numerous colors the most common are the chestnut body color Quarters Horses.

Conclusion

The legacy of the ancient Quarter Horse is notable, and can be seen in so many modern breeds, not only in the USA, but in many countries in the world.The mixed that originated American breeds showed that many of their bloodlines contain Quarter Horses influence, which can be observed in their physical features and  also in the skills that are present on their behavior.

The Thoroughbred has been a huge contributor to the lineage of the american quarter,being possible to appreciate his features in most of the sires and mares that were the founders of the Breed.We can’t forget the Arabian  and The Morgan horses input when analyzing the history of this great breed of the American stud book.

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